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Police & Fire
DCSO participating in Operation Dry Water to enhance enforcement of boating under the influence (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/25/18 7:00 AM
Operation Dry Water Logo
Operation Dry Water Logo
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DOUGLAS COUNTY, Ore. As part of a nationally coordinated effort to educate boaters about the dangers of boating while under the influence of alcohol or drugs, the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office will be participating in Operation Dry Water. Operation Dry Water is a year-round national campaign focused on raising awareness about boating under the influence. Alcohol use is the leading known contributing factor in recreational boater deaths and a leading contributor in boating accidents.

“Our goal is to educate boaters, not only about the laws regarding boating under the influence, but to help boaters understand the danger of boating impaired. Certain factors on the water such as wind, sun, noise and the rocking of the boat all impair a boater’s judgment, balance, vision and reaction time on the water,” says Sgt. Brad O’Dell. “At any given moment there are individuals in the water, on inner tubes, rafts or in other boats that depend on boat operators to be alert and in control of their vessel. People’s lives depend on it.”

The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office is asking boaters to enjoy this boating season and help keep everyone safe by not drinking alcohol while on the water, or operating a boat after you have consumed alcohol. Use of both legal and illegal drugs also impairs judgment and reaction time and makes it dangerous to operate a boat.

In addition to the year-round campaign, the annual Operation Dry Water heightened awareness and enforcement weekend will take place June 29-July 1. This three-day weekend is a national weekend of increased enforcement of boating under the influence laws and recreational boater outreach. In 2017, 518 impaired operators were removed by law enforcement across the country during Operation Dry Water Weekend.

As part of Operation Dry Water, law enforcement be out on the water informing boaters about safe boating practices and removing impaired operators from the water.

2017 U.S. Coast Guard Recreational Boating Statistics. 




Attached Media Files: ODW Flyer , Operation Dry Water Logo

Cottage Grove Man Wanted After Vehicle Pursuit (Photo)
Douglas Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/21/18 12:24 PM
James Bigelow
James Bigelow
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DRAIN, Ore. - A Cottage Grove man led deputies on a vehicle chase Wednesday afternoon. 

At 3:40 P.M., a deputy observed a 2000 Black Hyundai Tiburon operated by 39 year-old Cottage Grove resident James Francis Bigelow on Umpqua Highway 99 near Curtain Road. Bigelow took off at a high rate of speed and failed to stop when the deputy attempted to conduct a traffic stop for traffic violations. Bigelow turned onto Upper Smith River Road and eventually onto South Fork. After taking several spur roads, Bigelow fled from the vehicle on foot and ran into the brush. He was not located after an extensive search. 

Bigelow is wanted in connection to the incident. Anyone with knowledge of his whereabouts is asked to immediately contact the Douglas County Sheriff's Office at 541-440-4471 or their local law enforcement. 




Attached Media Files: James Bigelow

FBI's Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Online Sale Frauds (Part 1) (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 06/19/18 10:00 AM
TT - online sales example c
TT - online sales example c
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Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against online sale frauds.

Summer is upon us – and if you are like me, this is the best time to get rid of all that extra stuff sitting in your garage. Who couldn’t use a few extra bucks for that summer vacation, right?

You can do it the old fashioned way – sitting outside for hours on end, hoping someone drives up and offers you big money for your cast-offs. Or, you can sell on platforms like Craigslist and Facebook. Those are great options – if you are smart about how you do business.

I have some personal examples to share with you. Recently, I posted several items for sale… a bed, a barbeque and a few other things. Usually within the first 24 hours of a new posting I received at least one suspicious inquiry, either by email or text. In many cases, the seller said he or she needed to have a mover or shipper pick up the item. The seller proposed sending me a larger-than-requested payment by cashier’s check or electronic transfer, with the caveat that I would use those extra funds to pay the shipper when he arrives to pick up my item.

This is a version of an overpayment scam. Let’s say you get that check and cash it. The shipper takes the item, and eventually the bank figures out the cashier’s check is bogus. The bank is going to come after you for the missing funds and could even pursue criminal charges.

Electronic transfers are not necessarily safer. In a couple cases, the fraudster proposed making a payment via PayPal or a funds transfer. Had I pursued this option, the person would have likely ended up asking for personal information – including bank routing numbers – to push the payment through.

Here are some warning signs to watch for if you are trying to sell online this summer:

  • Look for out-of-area phone numbers. All of the suspicious inquiries I received came from area codes nowhere near Oregon. It is possible for scammers to spoof phone numbers, of course, so make sure to proceed cautiously even when you receive an inquiry from a local number.
  • Look for bad spelling, stilted language, random capitalizations and chunks of text that are obviously cut-and-pasted from your post.
  • Look for those who try to justify why they can’t meet in person. In once case, I had a fraudster claim to be a cabin steward on a major cruise line… which, he said, required an electronic payment and a shipping service. Really? Why does someone who works on a cruise ship need a large barbeque?

Next week we will look at some other scams that pop up in virtual garage sales – complete with more tips on safe selling.

If you have been victimized by an online overpayment scam or any other cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - online sales example c , TT - online sales example b , TT - online sales example a , TT - Online Sales - part 1 - Audio , TT - Online Sales graphic

Burglar Caught in Concessions Stand (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/25/18 10:14 AM
Exterior photo
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GOLD HILL, Ore. – A Jackson County Sheriff’s Office deputy responding to a report of noise at the Gold Hill Little League fields Saturday night caught a suspect in the act of burglarizing the concessions stand.  On June 23, 2018, at 9:37 p.m., a neighbor called to report a banging sound coming from the concessions stand area.

Chase Alan Martin, 18, was inside the building when the deputy arrived.  Deputies found that Martin had caused extensive damage to the concessions stand and another small building.  The air conditioning until had been removed to gain entrance and the inside of the concessions stand was ransacked.  Damages total at least $2000. 

Martin was apparently under the influence of alcohol and marijuana.  Martin was initially uncooperative with deputies, but they were able to take him into custody. 

The incident occurred two days after Martin’s 18th birthday, however he was lodged at the juvenile detention center in Medford due to an outstanding warrant for a juvenile probation violation.  Deputies cited Martin for new charges of second degree burglary, first degree criminal mischief, and second degree trespassing.  The case will be forwarded to the Jackson County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution. 

Case #18-12795

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Attached Media Files: Exterior photo , Martin booking photo

Crash Injures Two Motorcyclists (Photo)
Jackson Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/19/18 3:10 PM
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EAGLE POINT, Ore. – A crash involving two motorcycles and a pickup injured two White City men Monday evening.  Deputies are investigating whether impairment contributed to the crash. 

On June 18, 2018, at 7:31 p.m., dispatch received a 911 call reporting a crash on Dodge Road near the intersection with Wedgewood Drive.  Deputies learned that a westbound motorcycle collided with the eastbound pickup in the eastbound lane.  The force from the collision caused the motorcycle to collide with another westbound motorcycle. 

The motorcycles and their operators slid on the ground and came to rest off the roadway.  The pickup crashed through a fence and came to a stop in a field. 

Both motorcycle operators were transported to Rogue Regional Medical Center for treatment; one was transported by Mercy Flights helicopter with critical injuries. The driver and passenger in the pickup were not injured.

Witnesses reported seeing a third motorcycle rider, a woman who had been riding with the two men.  After the crash, she reportedly yelled for neighbors to call 911, and then left the scene.  Deputies would like to identify her in order to obtain a witness statement.

Deputies were assisted by JCSO detectives and a crash reconstruction team from the Oregon State Police.  Fire District #3 and Mercy Flights provided medical assistance. 

The incident remains under investigation.  Additional details are not available for release at this time. 

Anyone with information about the incident is asked to call Sergeant Scott Waldon at (541) 774-6800.  Refer to case #18-12375.

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Attached Media Files: Crash scene photo

Early Morning Stand-off Ends in Arrest of Attempted Murder Suspect
Medford Police Dept. - 06/21/18 4:10 PM

On June 21, 2018, at approximately 4:15am, Medford Police officers responded to the 1900 Block of Hutchins Circle for an assault report.

Upon arrival officers contacted the, 36 year old, female victim at a neighboring residence. She reported that she woke up to her ex-boyfriend, who she has a three year old child with, standing over her as she lay in bed. The suspect, identified as 37 year old Ryan Conner began to physically assault her. The victim was able to fend off the attack and flee to a neighbor’s home pleading for help. She was later transported to a local hospital by Mercy Ambulance with serious, but non-life threatening injuries.

Officers responded to the victim’s home and found evidence of a struggle inside, however, Conner was not located.  

Officers located Conner’s current address in the 1700 Block of Crater Lake Avenue and believed he was inside his apartment with their three year old child.  Officers surrounded the complex and attempted, for over an hour, to make contact with him.

Medford Police Detectives along with members of the SWAT team and Hostage Negotiators responded to the apartment complex. Additional attempts to contact Conner, led to him surrendering without incident at 7:20am.  

The investigation revealed Conner had walked to the victim’s residence and entered with a key. Once inside the home, Conner strangled the victim, hit her repeatedly with a rubber mallet and used an electrical stun device in an attempt to subdue her. Following the attack, Conner fled the victim’s residence on foot, returning to his apartment, where he had left his child sleeping. Conner planned this attack and told investigators he had also formulated several plans to dispose of the victim’s body.  

The child was uninjured and reunited with family members.

Conner was cooperative with investigators and following the interview he was lodged at the Jackson County Jail.

Suspect:

Conner, Ryan Daniel – 37 years old

1700 Block Crater Lake Ave

Charges:

Att. Murder

Assault 1 – Domestic

Assault 2 – Domestic

Att. Kidnap 1

Strangulation

Burglary 1

Child Neglect




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6231/115519/Suspect_Photo_-_Conner.docx

Graham Fire June 24, 2018 8:30 A.M. Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/24/18 9:04 AM

 As fire suppression tactics have increased containment and lowered the risk to structures, the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s resources will be released around noon today.  The Oregon Department of Forestry team will remain with local resources to continue mopping up and monitoring any remaining hot spots. 

Resources on the fire today are: 7 Hand crews, 6 Helicopters, 33 Engines, 1 Dozer, 8 Water tenders and 395 personnel.  The estimated containment is 60% and 2,143 acres.  

Today’s warmer temperatures and lower relative humidity may cause the fire to show more activity.  Fire fighters are seeing juniper trees torch in the interior of fire.  Air attack resources are available today to drop water on those trees if needed.

Lake Chinook Chief Don Colfels said, “Given the intensity of the fire and the strong winds driving it east, the fire had potential to leave dozens of families without a home today. Thanks to the work of our local crews, the support of other Central Oregon Agencies and state support from ODF and OSFM we were able to bring this fire to the more manageable state it is today. Additionally, because this community has worked hard to create defensible spaces many homes have been completely burned around and left intact”.

A public meeting is planned for Sunday, June 24 at 6:00 p.m. at the Chinook Store, 8241 SW Jordan Road in Culver. Residents are invited to hear from local officials to learn more about the fire and what they can do to protect their homes and lands in the future. 

Public information contact is Ashley Lertora; 503-338-8442.


Graham Fire Daily Update
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/23/18 11:06 AM

The Oregon Department of Forestry Type 1 Team and Oregon State Fire Marshall Green Team took unified command of the fire on Friday at 6 pm. Fire crews have made good progress battling the Graham Fire. The fire is estimated at approximately 2,055 acres and is burning in brush, timber and grass south of the Metolius River arm of Lake Billy Chinook near Culver, Oregon. Fire crews completed a burnout operation yesterday and will began mop up operations on Saturday. Today’s firefighting resources include: 7 hand crews, 26 Engines, 2 dozers, 4 water tenders, approximately 375 personnel and containment is estimated at 50%. Aircraft resources assigned to this fire are available to all fires in the area as needed.

Crews have set up fire camp at the Sisters Rodeo Grounds. Please use caution on Highway 20 near the rodeo grounds due to the additional fire traffic in the area.

The fire burned two residential structures and five out buildings, but many more were saved by local firefighting resources.

Further information regarding structure losses is not available at this time.

Due to ongoing fire danger Level 3 evacuations remain in effect for the Three Rivers subdivision. A staffed road block has been established near the Chinook Village Store restricting access to all except emergency personnel and credentialed media. For further information regarding evacuations, please refer to the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Facebook site or call Jefferson County Sheriff at 541-475-6520.

Interested media are to report to the Lake Chinook Fire Station at 11700 Graham Rd where a Public Information Officer will be available10:30am—7:00pm.

There are three structure task forces from Clackamas, Marion, Washington, Lane and Multnomah counties and have been mobilized under the Conflagration Act and will provide 24-hour structure protection threatened by the fire. The fire is burning on private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry and Lake Chinook Fire and Rescue, as well as Bureau of Land Management ownership. The cause of the fire is attributed to the lightning storm that passed through the area last Wednesday.

Updated information for the Graham Fire is available on InciWeb https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5855/
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Fireworks - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/22/18 10:00 AM
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The Office of State Fire Marshal, Oregon fire service, Keep Oregon Green,  the Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordination Group, natural resource agencies, Oregon licensed fireworks wholesalers, and safety experts encourage Oregonians to “Keep it Legal and Keep it Safe” when using fireworks. The 2018 Oregon fireworks retail sales season opens Saturday, June 23 and runs through Friday, July 6. The OSFM and their partners want everyone to know which fireworks are legal to use in Oregon without a permit, where they are permitted to be used, and the important safety steps to take when using fireworks. 

“I want to remind all Oregonians that consumer legal fireworks can only be purchased from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands,” says State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “And, regulations limit where those fireworks may be used. Fire risk in Oregon is approaching extreme conditions and there is no room for error in fireworks safety.”

July 4th holiday public land visitors are advised to leave all fireworks at home. The use of fireworks is prohibited on all national forestland, Oregon state parks, and beaches. “It’s best to leave fireworks to the professionals,” states Keep Oregon Green President Kristin Babbs. “Support your local community by enjoying fireworks at sponsored events. If you choose to use fireworks at home, make sure they stay on the pavement and always keep a bucket of water nearby for safety and to extinguish spent fireworks.”

Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are illegal in Oregon, without a permit.

There were 318 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon during 2017, resulting in eight injuries and more than $861,000 in property damage. Over the past five years, from 2013 through 2017, there were 1,355 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon resulting in one death, 34 injuries, and more than $3 million in property damage.

Officials may seize illegal fireworks and charge offenders with a class B misdemeanor which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per violation and a civil penalty of up to $500. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.

 “All Oregonians share the responsibility to use only consumer legal fireworks and use them carefully,” adds Walker. And we encourage you to be aware and considerate of neighbors and their pets, before deciding on when and where you choose to light fireworks.”

The OSFM encourages everyone to use the four B’s of safe fireworks use:

  • Be Prepared before lighting fireworks: keep water available by using a garden hose or bucket.
  • Be Safe when lighting fireworks: keep children and pets away from fireworks.
  • Be Responsible after lighting fireworks: never relight a dud. Wait 15 to 20 minutes then soak it in a bucket of water before disposal.
  • Be Aware: use only legal fireworks and use them only in legal places.

The four B’s of fireworks safety brochure is available here:

http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/4BesFireworks.pdf.

Tips in Spanish are also available at: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/Fireworks_4Bs_Spanish.pdf




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1062/115518/Firework_Image.jpg

Graham Fire declared a conflagration
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/21/18 9:45 PM

Governor Kate Brown has declared the Graham Fire, burning approximately 3 miles south of Billy Chinook, a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the state fire marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

The Office of State Marshal’s Green Incident Management Team and two structural task forces from Clackamas and Washington counties will arrive in the morning and begin working to protect structures.

The Jefferson County Emergency Manager said there was a Level 3 (Leave) evacuation order issued but it was unclear how many people had evacuated.

“This is a reminder that fire season has arrived,” said Chief Deputy State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple. “Please be aware of maintaining defensible space and know the fire restrictions in your area.”

Oregon’s conflagration may be invoked only by the Governor and allows the State Fire Marshal to dispatch structural firefighters and equipment. More information on Conflagration and Emergency

Mobilization is available at OSFM website:

 http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/2008_Oregon_Fire_Service_Mobilization_Plan.shtml.

Additional resources on surviving wildfires may be accessed at:


Media Advisory - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe Live safety demonstration -- safer use of legal fireworks in legal places
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/21/18 5:29 PM

WHEN:           Friday, June 22, 2018 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE:         Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center, 12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO:             The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State Parks, Clackamas Fire District #1, Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Oregon Burn Center, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon licensed fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, and safety education and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled. 

WHAT:           Keep it legal, keep it safe

  • Legal fireworks in legal places
  • Live demonstration – Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. The Office of State Fire Marshal has issued approximately 722 retail fireworks permits, and 138 display permits. Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon without a permit.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in state parks, and campgrounds, and on all federal public lands.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Officials may seize illegal fireworks and charge offenders with a class B misdemeanor which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per violation and a civil penalty of up to $500. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.


Media Advisory - Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe Live safety demonstration -- safer use of legal fireworks in legal places - Media Advisory
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/19/18 3:03 PM

WHEN:           Friday, June 22, 2018 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE:         Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center

12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO:             The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, U.S. Forest Service, Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon State Parks, Clackamas Fire District #1, Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, Oregon Burn Center, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon licensed fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, and safety education and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled. 

WHAT:           Keep it legal, keep it safe

  • Legal fireworks in legal places
  • Live demonstration – Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. The Office of State Fire Marshal has issued approximately 722 retail fireworks permits, and 138 display permits. Oregon law prohibits possession, use, or sale of any firework that flies into the air, explodes, or travels more than 12 feet horizontally on the ground, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon without a permit.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds, and on all federal public lands.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Officials may seize illegal fireworks and charge offenders with a class B misdemeanor which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per violation and a civil fine of up to $500. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.


Fatal motor vehicle crash Hwy 101 near Beaver Oregon - Tillamook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/24/18 8:11 AM
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On Friday, June 22, 2018 at about 7:45am, an Oregon State Police Trooper and emergency personnel responded to a report of a traffic crash on US Highway 101 near milepost 76.5, north of Beaver.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a silver 2003 Saab, operated by Mikayla Michelle HOWARD, age 18, of Beaver, was traveling northbound when the vehicle crossed into the southbound lane of travel for an unknown reason.  The vehicle struck a southbound red 2018 Kenworth log truck with a bunked trailer head on.  The Kenworth Tractor was driven by Howard Edwin RHOADES, are 64, from Toledo.

HOWARD was transported by ambulance to Tillamook Regional Medical Center with critical injuries.  She was later transported by Life Flight helicopter to Oregon Health Sciences University for further treatment.  HOWARD died from injuries sustained during the crash. 

RHOADES was not injured as a result of the crash. 

US Highway 101 was closed for approximately two hours following the crash.   OSP was assisted by Nestucca Fire and Rescue,  Tillamook County Sheriff's Office, Tillamook Regional Medical Center Ambulance, Life Flight, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115582/20180622_080240.jpg

Oregon State Police is Hosting a National Summit on School Safety Tip Lines (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/21/18 10:22 AM
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Representatives from 21 States and Canada are gathering in Salem, Oregon next week for a three-day Summit (Monday June 25 – Wednesday June 27). The Summit is the first of its kind and will feature presentations from experts, government officials, and other school safety leaders regarding the effective implementation and operation of tip lines to prevent threats to student safety. Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum will welcome participants and kick off the Summit.

Oregon State Police will showcase the State’s school safety tip line SafeOregon. SafeOregon launched statewide in January 2017, and to date, generated over 1,450 tips. For more details visit www.safeoregon.com.  

“This summit will give the opportunity to share information first hand and learn from others with years of experience to help Oregon continue to improve our processes and tip line tool to be the best resource it can for our young Oregonians.”  Superintendent Travis Hampton.

Outcomes of the Summit include a blueprint for implementing and sustaining a tip line. OSP is partnering with RTI International and Summit participants to develop a framework to share with others interested in starting at tip line.

Pre-registration was required to attend this event.

Media is welcome to attend on Monday, June 25, 2018 until the conclusion of Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum’s welcoming. (Media needs to be set up by 12:30 PM.  We expect remarks to be done by 1:00 PM)

 About SafeOregon

SafeOregon is a statewide resource managed by Oregon State Police and is designed to accept confidential or anonymous reports concerning student safety through a phone call, text message, mobile application or the internet by students and other members of the public. The school safety tip line program is called SafeOregon. It became Law through HB 4075 (2016), as a result of recommendations from the Oregon Task Force on School Safety.

About RTI International

RTI International is an independent, nonprofit research institute dedicated to improving the human condition. Clients rely on us to answer questions that demand an objective and multidisciplinary approach—one that integrates expertise across the social and laboratory sciences, engineering, and international development. We believe in the promise of science, and we are inspired every day to deliver on that promise for the good of people, communities, and businesses around the world.  For more information, visit www.rti.org.




Attached Media Files: 2018-06/1002/115491/Picture1.png

Motorcyclist dies in crash north of Albany - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 06/20/18 7:25 AM

On June 19th, 2018 at about 12:35 pm Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a crash involving a motorcycle and an SUV.  The crash occurred near the intersection of Dever-Conner Road and Interstate 5 in Linn County. 

The preliminary investigation revealed a Harley Davidson motorcycle driven by Eric Wayne Clanfield, age 42 of Dallas, was traveling west on Dever-Conner Road.  A Infiniti Sport Utility Vehicle, driven by Kristin Dawn Holcomb, age 44 of Albany, was traveling east on Dever-Conner Road and was attempting to turn left onto the southbound on ramp to I-5.  The SUV turned in front of the motorcycle which resulted in a nearly head on collision.  Clanfield was deceased at the scene due to the injuries he sustained in the crash.  Holcomb was not injured.

Jefferson Fire Department, Linn County Sheriff’s department, Oregon Department of Transportation arrived on scene to assist. 

Dever-Conner Road was closed for about 3 hours.

  


Commercial Structure Fire - 3031 NE Stephens Street - 6-21-18
Roseburg Fire Department - 06/21/18 10:34 AM

At 1:53 a.m. on June 21, 2018, the Roseburg Fire Department was dispatched to a commercial structure fire at 3031 NE Stephens Street.  An on-duty police officer reported the fire inside the structure.

Firefighters arrived on scene to find light smoke showing inside the two-story structure, which is currently under construction.  Upon arrival, firefighters found most of the fire already extinguished, reducing the amount of damage to the structure.     

A total of 15 firefighters assisted with the firefighting operations. Other agencies assisting with the fire included Roseburg Police Department, Douglas County Fire District #2, Douglas County Sheriff’s Office, and Bay Cities Ambulance.

The structure, which is valued at $5,750,000, suffered approximately $50,000 in damage.  According to fire investigators, the fire is suspicious in nature and is under investigation. 


Utilities
Power restored in Josephine, Del Norte counties
Pacific Power - 06/19/18 11:14 AM

Power restored in Josephine, Del Norte counties

GRANTS PASS, Ore.--About 64,000 Pacific Power customers were without electricity Tuesday morning after a transmission substation in Grants Pass was damaged by onsite construction work. A full investigation is ongoing.

The outage, which affected communities from Rogue River to Merlin to Cave Junction to Crescent City started at 9:07 a.m. and was restored at 9:39 a.m. Crews were quickly able to reroute power to restore service. Work continues on the repairs to the line.

“We want to thank our customers for their patience,” said Christina Kruger, regional business manager for Pacific Power in southern Oregon.  "We were able to restore power quickly, but we realize being without electricity is an inconvenience even for a short time.”


Federal
BLM seeks bids for new public off-range pastures for wild horses and burros
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 06/20/18 1:50 PM

WASHINGTON— The Bureau of Land Management announced today that it is seeking proposals for new public off-range pastures that provide a free-roaming environment for wild horses removed from Western public lands while also allowing for regular public visitation.

Today’s announcement is part of the BLM’s effort to address the growing overpopulation of wild horses and burros on public rangelands. As of March 1, 2018, the wild horse and burro population on public lands was estimated at 81,951 animals, which is more than triple the number of animals the land can support in conjunction with other legally mandated land uses. This chronic overpopulation increases the risk of damage to rangeland resources and raises the chances of starvation and thirst for animals in overpopulated herds.

New public off-range pastures are a more cost-effective and efficient approach to managing costs for animals in holding while providing the public with opportunities to view wild horses in a natural setting. The pastures will also provide opportunities for the public to adopt animals into private care in order to help reduce the number of animals in holding.

One or more public off-range pasture contracts will be awarded and each pasture must accommodate at least 100 to 500 wild horses. Selected participants will be contracted by the BLM to provide humane care for up to 10 years.

Proposals will be accepted through July 10, 2018, from the following states: Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Oklahoma and Wyoming.

 All applicants are required to possess a Dun and Bradstreet number authorizing them to conduct business with the Federal Government.  These can be obtained at www.dnb.com.  Applicants are then asked to access the System for Award Management, at www.sam.gov. There is no fee involved.

To obtain the bid solicitation: (1) go to www.fedconnect.net; (2) click on “Search Public Opportunities”; (3) under Search Criteria, select “Reference Number”; (4) enter the solicitation number “L15PS00182”; and (5) click Search” and the solicitation information will appear. The solicitation form describes what applicants should submit and where to send application information. 

For assistance, please contact Kemi Ismael at (202) 912-7098 or kismael@blm.gov. Ms. Ismael can assist with general questions and/or coordinate a meeting between applicants and a local BLM contracting officer and small business specialist. A list of frequently asked questions with additional information is available at:  www.blm.gov/whb.

To learn more about adopting a wild horse or burro online, visit the new Online Corral at https://wildhorsesonline.blm.gov/.

-BLM–

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.


Statement from the Federal Protective Service (FPS)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/25/18 3:39 AM

Portland, Ore. – At 3:30 A.M., a joint Department of Homeland Security team of law enforcement officers from the Federal Protective Service (FPS) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) entered the federal building at 4310 SW Macadam Ave., to secure government property.

The Federal Protective Service is the lead agency in the effort and any questions should be referred to Robert Sperling, Federal Protective Service Director of Communications at (202) 420-1287 or obert.sperling@hq.dhs.gov">robert.sperling@hq.dhs.gov.


Nigerian Leader of Nationwide Identity Theft and IRS Tax Fraud Scheme Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/21/18 7:58 AM

False federal tax returns filed using the personal identifying information of thousands of Oregon and Washington taxpayers

EUGENE, Ore. – On Wednesday, June 20, 2018, Emmanuel Oluwatosin Kazeem, 35, of Bowie, Maryland and Nigeria, was sentenced to 15 years in prison for leading a vast conspiracy to steal identities and file fraudulent tax returns. He was ordered to pay more than $12 million in restitution and will be subject to deportation when released from prison.

“Emmanuel Kazeem orchestrated one of the largest tax fraud schemes in our nation’s history. The complexity of this case and the incredible effort by law enforcement to bring those responsible to justice cannot be understated,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I want to remind everyone that this case began when vigilant Oregonians notified the IRS when fraudulently tax returns were filed in their names. It only takes one tip to make a difference and bring down a complex criminal organization.”

“IRS-CI vigorously investigates criminals who band together to take advantage of our tax system. Today’s sentencing of Emmanuel Kazeem sends a strong message to those who seek to rob U.S. citizens of their hard earned tax dollars,” said Acting Special Agent in Charge, Brian Payne.

According to court documents and evidence presented at trial, in May 2013, a victim in Medford, Oregon notified the IRS that false federal and Oregon state tax returns were filed electronically using her and her husband’s personal identifying information (PII) including social security numbers and dates of birth.

An IRS investigation led to search warrants of residences in Illinois, Maryland, and Georgia and to numerous email and instant messenger accounts used by Kazeem and other co-conspirators. At a Chicago residence, agents seized approximately 150 prepaid debit cards and $50,000 in money orders. In Maryland and Georgia, agents seized more than 50 electronic devices, 40 money orders in amounts exceeding $29,000, $14,000 in cash and numerous prepaid debit cards containing over $12,000 in fraudulent tax refunds. The search warrants helped agents identify Kazeem as the leader and mastermind of the scheme.

The scheme resulted in the conspirators possessing stolen PII of more than 259,000 victims. Kazeem purchased more than 91,000 identities from a Vietnamese hacker that originated from an Oregon company’s private database. The company provided pre-employment and volunteer background checks for thousands of clients. Kazeem divided the identities into batches and shared them with other co-conspirators. They were in turn used to file fraudulent tax returns between 2012 and 2015.

In carrying out the scheme, Kazeem trained and directed his co-conspirators including his younger brother, Michael Oluwasegun Kazeem, to use stolen PII to obtain thousands of electronic filing PINs to bypass IRS authentication procedures. They acquired over 19,500 E-File PINS during the course of the conspiracy. Kazeem also used taxpayers’ PII to gain unauthorized access into many taxpayers’ IRS transcripts, which contain sensitive personal financial information. Conspirators also used pre-paid debit cards with the victims’ stolen identities to receive direct electronic tax refund deposits from the IRS.

In total, Kazeem was linked to 10,139 fraudulent federal tax returns attempting to get over $91 million dollars in refunds and successfully receiving over $11.6 million dollars. Refunds were withdrawn from the debit cards and at least 2,000 wire transfers totaling over $2.1 million dollars were sent to Nigeria. Over 700 of those wire transfers, totaling more than $690,000, were directly linked to Kazeem.

Kazeem used the conspiracy windfall to place a nearly $200,000 down payment on a newly constructed house and to purchase a $175,000 townhouse, both in Maryland. His average monthly credit card payment during 2012 to 2015 was over $8,300. Kazeem also attempted to use his ill-gotten funds to develop a $6 million dollar, 4-star hotel in Lagos, Nigeria.

In May 2015, Kazeem transferred the townhouse to his sister in Nigeria for $10 and included her on the deed to his Maryland residence, also for $10. He was arrested one day later.

IRS agents determined Kazeem had no verifiable sources of income between 2012 and 2015. In order to disguise the source of the fraudulent refunds, he listed sources of income from bogus employers in reports to both the IRS and immigration authorities. After entering the United States on a student visa from Nigeria, Kazeem engaged in marriage fraud to evade immigration laws. In April 2014, while leading the tax fraud scheme, he filed for naturalization under the Immigration and Nationality Act. Based on the false information provided to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, he was approved. The same year he personally participated in filing over 1,445 fraudulent federal tax returns and received over $3,385,000 from returns paid out by the IRS.

Kazeem was convicted by a federal jury on 19 counts, including mail and wire fraud, aggravated identity theft and conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, in Medford on August 4, 2017. Five other co-conspirators, Oluwaseunara Osanyinbi, Oluwatobi Dehinbo, Lateef Animawun, Oluwamuyiwa Olawoye and Michael Kazeem, previously received federal prison sentences for their roles in the same conspiracy.

This case results from a joint investigation by IRS-Criminal Investigation, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Homeland Security Investigations with support provided by the Department of Treasury, Inspector General for Tax Administration, the U.S. State Department, and the Oregon Department of Revenue Policy and Systems Unit. The case is being prosecuted by Byron Chatfield and Gavin Bruce, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115461/SENTENCING-Kazeem-Final.pdf

Portland Couple Accused of Interstate Distribution of Marijuana and Firearms Crimes (Photo)
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/20/18 2:25 PM
Image 1
Image 1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/6325/115463/thumb_IMG_1479.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore. – Isaiah Lee Holt, 30, and Marjorie Livingston, 37, residents of Portland, were charged today in a five-count indictment alleging the couple engaged in a conspiracy to distribute marijuana and illegally purchased and possessed firearms.

Holt is charged with one count each of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute marijuana, possession with intent to distribute marijuana, possession with intent to distribute cocaine, and felon in possession of a firearm.

Holt made an initial appearance today in federal court before U.S. Magistrate Judge Paul Papak. He will appear at an arraignment and detention hearing on June 21, 2018.

Livingston is charged with one count of conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute marijuana and one count of making false statements during the purchase of a firearm. She is expected to make her first appearance before a federal magistrate judge on or before June 22, 2018.

According to court documents, in February 2018, Livingston is alleged to have illegally purchased a firearm for Holt, a convicted felon, at a licensed federal firearms dealer located in Portland.

ATF agents obtained a search warrant on Holt and Livingston’s NE Portland residence. On April 4, 2018, while surveilling Holt and the residence, agents contacted Holt and conducted a search of his person. Holt possessed two cell phones, two bundles of cash, two sets of keys, and seven small baggies of cocaine weighing approximately 11.5 grams.

Later the same day, agents conducted a search of the residence where they found materials consistent with drug trafficking including digital scales, small baggies, and Inositol, an agent commonly used for “cutting” cocaine.  Subsequent searches of the residence revealed a locked safe containing $46,100 in cash, two large plastic totes containing approximately 14 pounds of marijuana, U.S. Postal Service mailing labels, a heat sealer and food saver bags. Agents also found a Ruger AR-556 rifle, a Taurus 9mm pistol and a loaded M&P Shield .40 caliber firearm with an attached Crimson Trace laser.

Searches conducted of Holt and Livingston’s phones revealed numerous text and picture messages referencing marijuana and bank deposits. Messages were exchanged with phone numbers in North Carolina, Georgia, Texas and Florida. These messages included photos of bulk marijuana, shipping receipts, and bank deposit receipts.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime; defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Indictment Release , Image 1 , Image 2 , Image 3 , Image 4 , Image 5 , Image 6 , Image 7 , Image 8

Seattle Man Pleads Guilty to Fraud Conspiracy Involving Former Oregon Department of Energy Employee
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/20/18 2:15 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Martin J. Shain, 61, of Seattle, Washington, pleaded guilty today to one count each of conspiracy to defraud the U.S. and tax evasion.

According to court documents, between June 2012 and March 2015, Shain and Joseph Colello, a former employee of the Oregon Department of Energy’s (ODOE) Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) program, maintained a secret business relationship whereby the two would personally profit from the sale and purchase of Oregon BETCs.

Shain and Colello devised a plan whereby Colello would give Shain the names of BETC sellers and interested buyers—information he had access to as an ODOE employee. Colello would then contact the sellers and buyers to negotiate credit transfers, but made it appear as though the Shain had brokered the deals. Shain created a company in the name of his relative in order to receive commission payments from the sellers of the tax credits and to conceal their earned income from the IRS. Shain charged sellers a 1-2% fee, undercutting brokers who typically charged a 10% fee for facilitating similar transfers. Colello would receive a portion of this fee as a kickback.

Between 2012 and 2015, Shain deposited over $1.3 million in income from the commissions charged to sellers of BETC credits. He would transfer a portion of these funds into a personal account from which he would purchase and issue biweekly cashier’s checks payable to Colello. Over the course of the conspiracy, Shain purchased and issued approximately 58 cashier’s checks to Colello or Colello’s girlfriend. In total, Colello received more than $300,000 in bribe payments for his role in the scheme. Shain failed to report more than $1.34 million in income received brokering tax credit sales on four income tax returns between 2012 and 2015.

Colello pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to engage in monetary transactions in property derived from specific unlawful activity, one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States, and one count of filing a false income tax return on March 15, 2018. On April 3, 2018, he was sentenced to 60 months in prison and was ordered to pay more than $81,000 in restitution.

Shain faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison, a $250,000 fine and three years of supervised release on each charge. He will be sentenced on September 20, 2018 before U.S. District Court Judge Robert E. Jones.

The case was investigated by IRS Criminal Investigation and the FBI and prosecuted by Claire M. Fay and Scott E. Bradford, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-06/6325/115459/CHANGE_OF_PLEA-Shain-Final.pdf

Former Oregon State University Student Charged for Threatening Campus Shooting
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/20/18 12:08 PM

EUGENE. Ore. – Christopher Adam Strahan, 22, a resident of Corvallis, Oregon, was indicted today for threatening a campus shooting at Oregon State University (OSU).

The indictment alleges Strahan threatened to shoot classmates at OSU in a series of tweets on February 27, 2018. He is charged with a single count of making threatening communications in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 875.

Strahan was previously detained as a flight risk and danger to the community when he made his initial appearance in federal court on a criminal complaint on March 27, 2018. Strahan will be arraigned on the indictment on June 27, 2018 before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jolie A. Russo.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

Anyone who witnesses imminent threats of violence in any form made via internet or another means should call 9-1-1 immediately. Non-emergency tips can be submitted by contacting the FBI’s Portland Field Office at (503) 224-4181 or visiting the SafeOregon website at www.safeoregon.com.

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State
Parole & Probation Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/21/18 11:00 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 77th Basic Parole & Probation Officer Class on Friday, June 29, 2018 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon.  The event will begin at 11:00 a.m. with a reception to follow after the ceremony.  Ross Caldwell of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission will be the guest speaker.  All family and friends of students, supervisors, department heads and elected officials are welcome to attend.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.

Reception immediately following.

Roster of Basic Parole and Probation Class 77

 

Parole & Probation Officer Zeth Allen

Lincoln County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Patricia Arrington

Umatilla County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Eileen Bailey

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Nathan Biel

Lane County Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Megan Bubar

Columbia County Community Corrections

 

Manager Thanh Dang

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Amanda Dennis

Washington County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Robert Divine

Jackson County Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Maria Frank

Lake County Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Daniel Garcilazo-Madrigal

Umatilla County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Janine Grund

Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Trevor Kendall

Lincoln County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Sarah Mosley

Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Kari Page

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Amanda Parks

Deschutes County Adult Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer James Rodriguez

Jefferson County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Molly Seel

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Rodney Sofich

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

Parole & Probation Officer Phillip Trupe

 Lincoln County Community Corrections

 

Parole & Probation Officer Nicole Vann

Lane County Parole & Probation

 

Parole & Probation Officer Laura Vejar

Multnomah County Adult Community Justice

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.


DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


ODF, Forest Service announce first timber sale under Good Neighbor Authority on Fremont-Winema Forest
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/19/18 4:27 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry and the USDA Forest Service jointly announced today the award of the first timber sale contract under the Good Neighbor Authority (GNA).

The sale is part of the Paddock Butte GNA restoration project on the Fremont-Winema National Forest and represents the first ODF-administered timber sale under the GNA. The Paddock Butte timber sale was awarded to Ore-Cal Land Development, LLC of Klamath Falls, and the contract signed on June 6.

Governor Kate Brown and Pacific Northwest Regional Forester Jim Peña signed a Master Agreement in March 2016 to execute the Good Neighbor Agreement in Oregon. Under GNA, which was authorized by Congress in the 2014 Farm Bill, state agencies work in partnership with the USDA Forest Service to implement restoration projects on federal lands.

Chad Davis, Director of the ODF Partnership & Planning Program, said that GNA is an integral component of the department’s Federal Forest Restoration Program, first initiated by the state legislature in 2013.

“GNA allows us to significantly ramp up our partnership with the U.S. Forest Service to increase the pace, scale and quality of restoration. The Paddock Butte project is a prime example of the work needed to improve forest health to increase the resiliency of our fire-prone forests to uncharacteristic wildfire and invasive species,” Davis said.

The Paddock Butte timber sale is 637 acres of ponderosa pine on National Forest System lands in Klamath County on the Bly Ranger District and within the ODF Klamath-Lake District.  The sale area is surrounded on three sides by private land and is located north of Gerber Reservoir.

The Paddock Butte GNA project is more than a timber sale. It permits activities to treat insect and disease-infected trees, reduce hazardous fuels, and other treatments to restore or improve forest, rangeland and watershed health, including wildlife habitat.

“Paddock Butte embodies the spirit of GNA,” said USDA Forest Service Lakeview and Bly District Ranger Mike Ramsey. “It’s an area where restoration and fuel reduction work is already occurring on private and other government lands. If the Forest Service land was left untreated, that has the potential to intensify the effects of a wildfire and undermine all the valuable restoration work being done by other landowners.”

Typically timber revenues on federal lands would return to the federal agency.  A benefit to GNA is that ODF can administer the timber sale and use the resulting funds to recover their administrative costs and fund additional restoration activities, including invasive weed treatments and juniper removal.

Public in the area may see increased traffic in the area during the timber harvest and subsequent fuel reduction, including the application of prescribed fire, and other restoration treatments.

The Paddock Butte sale and restoration project was identified as a high priority treatment area by the Klamath-Lake Forest Health Partnership, the Oregon Department of Forestry's Klamath-Lake District, and the Fremont-Winema National Forest.                    

For more information on the Paddock Butte project or the Fremont-Winema National Forest, please visit www.fs.usda.gov/fremont-winema, follow the forest on Twitter @FremontWinemaNF or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/R6FWNF.

For more information on the Oregon Department of Forestry: www.oregon.gov/ODF/pages/index.aspx, on Twitter via @ORDeptForestry or on Facebook via @oregondepartmentofforestry.


WorkSource Prineville Moving to New Location
Oregon Employment Department - 06/25/18 10:07 AM

Salem - WorkSource Prineville will relocate to new location on Monday, July 2. WorkSource Prineville will continue to operate at its old location at 2321 NE 3rd street through Thursday, June 28. The center will open for business at the new location, 457 NE Ochoco Plaza Drive, at 9 a.m. the following Monday.

 

WorkSource Prineville is one of 37 WorkSource Oregon centers located throughout the state providing a wide range of services to businesses and job seekers.

 

WorkSource Oregon is a network of public and private partners who work together to effectively respond to workforce challenges through high-quality services to businesses and individuals—resulting in job attainment, retention, and advancement. For more information go to www.WorkSourceOregon.org.




Attached Media Files: WorkSource Prineville Moving to New Location

Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 3:37 PM

June 22, 2018

Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22 
Reduced cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir, located six miles east of Cottage Grove in Lane County, due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the reservoir are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.” 


Dental Pilot Project Rules Advisory Committee meets June 25
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 2:19 PM

What: The Oral Health Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division is convening a series of rules advisory committee (RAC) meetings to discuss amendments to rules related to Dental Pilot Projects.

The purpose of the RAC is to provide feedback and input on the development of amended rule language, as well as review the statement of need and fiscal impact for the proposed rules.

Agenda: Review background information; brief overview of the rulemaking process; review draft amended rules; next steps.

When: June 25, 9 am-11am. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1A, Portland. Conference line: 1-888-273-3658, participants code: 76-64-09

Background: Senate Bill 738, passed by the Oregon State Legislature in 2011, allows the Oregon Health Authority to approve dental pilot projects once an application has been approved. These projects are intended to evaluate the quality of care, access, cost, workforce, and efficacy by teaching new skills to existing categories of dental personnel; developing new categories of dental personnel; accelerating the training of existing categories of dental personnel; or teaching new oral health care roles to previously untrained persons.

Materials: Copies of materials are available online at healthoregon.org/dpp

Program contact: Sarah Kowalski, 971-673-1563, ah.e.kowalski@state.or.us">sarah.e.kowalski@state.or.us.

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Recreational use advisory issued for Lake Billy Chinook due to cyanotoxins
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 1:45 PM

High levels of cyanobacteria toxins found in Jefferson County water body

The Oregon Health Authority issued a recreational use health advisory today for areas of Lake Billy Chinook due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom. The lake is located about 12 miles west of Madras, in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of cyanobacteria and the toxins they produce in Perry South Cove on the Metolious Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. The cyanotoxin concentrations found can be harmful to humans and animals.

The advisory extends from the cove at Perry South Campground to the southern tip of Three Rivers Island located downstream in the Metolious Arm.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from this area of the lake at this time is especially dangerous. OHA public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

Anyone drawing in-home water directly from the affected area is advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing cyanotoxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce cyanotoxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people are connected to public water systems or are on wells in the area, that water is not affected by the bloom in the lake. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Lake Billy Chinook and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to cyanotoxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to this area of Lake Billy Chinook for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in this area of the lake.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid exposure to affected water, people are encouraged to visit this area of Lake Billy Chinook and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “algae bloom advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

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Recreational use health advisory lifted June 22 for Upper Klamath Lake
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 1:42 PM

Reduced cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 15 for Upper Klamath Lake—located off Oregon Route 140, 15 miles west of Klamath Falls in Klamath County—due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom and the toxins they produced.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of cyanobacteria (harmful algae) is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.”

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Recreational use health advisory for Dorena Reservoir lifted June 22
Oregon Health Authority - 06/22/18 1:37 PM

Reduced cyanobacteria, cyanotoxin levels confirmed

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued June 13 for Dorena Reservoir, located six miles east of Cottage Grove in Lane County, due to the presence of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) bloom.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in the reservoir are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, OHA officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of a cyanobacteria (harmful algae) blooms in all Oregon waters, because blooms can develop and disappear throughout the season. Only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are monitored for cyanobacteria by state, federal and local agencies, therefore, you are your own best advocate when it comes to keeping you and your family safe while recreating.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0440.

For information about recreational advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select “Algae Bloom Advisories.”

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Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets June 27
Oregon Health Authority - 06/20/18 2:21 PM

June 20, 2018

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets June 27

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC)

When: June 27, 1-3 p.m. A 10-minute public comment period is scheduled at 2:50 p.m.; comments are limited to five minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1B, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Conference call line: 877-873-8018, access code 7872333.

Agenda: Outbreaks update; infection control infection and response (ICAR) tools; nursing home prevalence study; injection practice and needle use project update; TAP assessment progress; discussion; public comment.

Background: OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of health care-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI program. The board meets on a quarterly basis to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities. More information is available on the program's webpage at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Prevention/Pages/Meetings.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Roza Tammer at 971-673-1074, 711 TTY, or oza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us">roza.p.tammer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Correction: Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup to meet June 20 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/20/18 10:49 AM

June 13, 2018

What: A public meeting of the Out of Hospital Births Prior Authorization Review Workgroup.

When: Wednesday, June 20, 10 a.m. to noon. A public comment period will be held at approximately 11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Conference Room 1D, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland.

The public also may attend by conference call at 888-278-0296, participant code 843163.

Agenda: Welcome, introductions and process overview; background and workgroup scope and goal; current process for out-of-hospital births prior authorization; challenges with and reflections on PA process; public comment; summary and next steps.

Background: The Out of Hospital Births Workgroup met in 2016-2017 to discuss the Oregon Health Plan's coverage of childbirth in settings other than hospitals. The workgroup presented recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority in summer 2017. OHA is convening this small group to undertake the workgroup's third recommendation, "Prior Authorization Process Review," with the goal of optimizing safety while improving the efficiency of the process. Questions and public comments may be submitted to OOHB.Workgroup@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services.  OHA provides free help.  Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY or heather.n.johnson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

This news release was updated June 20, 2018, at 10:44 a.m., to correct the telephone number.


$7.3 million Megabucks ticket was a lucky mistake
Oregon Lottery - 06/22/18 8:07 AM

June 22, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – The $7.3 million Oregon’s Game Megabucks winning ticket started out as a lucky mistake.
When Charles Svitak (pronounced ‘Swee-Tok’) of Central Point noticed the Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot was more than $7 million, he went to his local 7-Eleven to pick up a ticket. When he went to buy the ticket, the clerk told him that there were two mistake tickets that had already been printed, and offered him the chance to purchase them. Svitak opted to buy one of the two tickets.
Svitak said he went out to his vehicle, thought about it, then went back in and purchased the other mistake ticket – a decision that turned out to be worth $7.3 million.
“When I checked the ticket on my computer I couldn’t believe it,” Svitak, who works a graveyard shift in Medford, said. “The first thing I thought is that I had worked my last graveyard shift. It was a very good day.”
Svitak immediately traveled to Salem to claim his prize – without telling his wife.
“On the way home I got a new truck and put the oversized check they gave me on the windshield,” he said. “Then I took her out to show her truck and she realized I won the lottery. She hasn’t stopped giggling since.”
Svitak took the lump sum option and was given a check for $3.65 million for his prize. The couple said they are talking to a financial planner and said they planned on traveling and purchasing a couple of new vehicles with the winnings.
The winning ticket was sold at the 7-Eleven on Front Street in Central Point on Saturday, June 16 -- the day of the draw. Svitak became the 284th Oregon’s Game Megabucks millionaire since Nov. 20, 1985, when the game first launched. William Breese of Portand was the last Oregon’s Game Megabucks jackpot winner, $8.9 million, in March.
During the 2015-17 biennium, more than $34 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education and watershed enhancement in Jackson County, where Svitak lives.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Did you buy a Powerball ticket in Salem? You may have won $150 million
Oregon Lottery - 06/21/18 3:22 PM

June 21, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – An Oregon Lottery player matched all numbers drawn in Wednesday night’s $150.4 million Powerball® jackpot. The winning ticket was sold in Salem. The specific store location is not available for release until after the ticket has been redeemed and validated at Lottery headquarters in Salem.

Winning numbers for draw date (June 20, 2018): 4 -14 - 23 - 27 - 56 and the power ball was 13

The Power Play multiplier was 2

The winning Salem ticket was the only ticket sold to have the all the winning numbers. More than 6,800 winning tickets, with smaller prizes, were sold in Oregon during the June 20 draw.

A winner has one year from the date of the drawing to claim the prize. Oregon Lottery office hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Players have two jackpot prize payment options when claiming their Powerball tickets. One option is the “annuity” plan, under which Powerball jackpots provide the winner(s) with 30 annual payments.  Under the “cash” option, the winners(s) receives a one-time lump sum payment equal to approximately one-half the final jackpot. If the winner opts to take the lump sum, they can take home nearly $61.7 million after taxes. If the winner opts for the annuity option they will receive 30 graduated payments over 29 years. Federal withholding is 24 percent and state withholding is 8 percent.

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states plus the District of Columbia, the US Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. By pooling a portion of each lottery’s Powerball sales, this game is able to offer players jackpots of far greater value than any lottery could offer alone.

This is the fifth time a ticket sold in Oregon has had all the winning numbers. Previous winners include Dan Gannon of Milwaukie who won $182.7 million in 2006; The West and Chaney families of Medford who won $340 million; Robin Powell of Beaverton who won $33.8 million in 1999; and the Givens family of Eugene who won $38.4 million in 1992.

It is also the fifth time the Powerball jackpot has been won this year nationwide.

In Oregon, the winner’s name, city, city of retailer, date of win, prize and game played are considered public information and will be released.

For additional information about the Powerball jackpot, please contact the Oregon Lottery Public Affairs the next business day at 503-540-1015.

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25,1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

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Operation Dry Water Focuses on Impaired Boat Operators (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 06/22/18 12:00 PM
Operation Dry Water messaging
Operation Dry Water messaging
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/4139/115531/thumb_ODW_osmb.jpg

The Marine Board and law enforcement from 32 counties and the Oregon State Police will be participating in Operation Dry Water during the weekend of June 29- July 1, as part of a nationally coordinated effort to reduce the number of accidents and fatalities related to boating under the influence of intoxicants (BUII).  

“To help marine officers prepare, we train them to recognize drug and alcohol impairment and arrest those operators –including those with paddles,” says Randy Henry, Boating Safety Manager for the Marine Board. 

Boating under the influence of intoxicants means prescription drugs, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, or any other substance that impairs a person’s ability to make sound judgments and have the ability to safely operate a boat.  The effects of drugs and alcohol are also amplified on the water with the combination of sun glare, wind, waves and other environmental stressors.  Alcohol also dehydrates the body making sudden immersion into cold water at an even greater risk for drowning. 

Impaired boaters can expect to be arrested or face serious penalties.  In Oregon, the consequences of being convicted of BUII include the possibility of jail time, $6,250 in fines and loss of boating privileges.  Marine officers can arrest boaters on observed impairment and can legally obtain blood, breath or urine if a boater fails field sobriety testing.  So far this year, nine people have been arrested for BUII. 

“Overall, recreational boating is very safe if boaters wear life jackets, boat sober, and keep a sharp lookout. Waterways are becoming more crowded with a variety of mixed boating and other activities, so it’s important to pay attention to what’s going on around you and to follow the navigation rules of the road.  If boaters changed two things; wear life jackets and abstain from substances, accidents would be extremely rare,” says Henry.  So far this year, the common denominators for accidents include impairment, distracted operation and no life jacket.   Henry goes on to say, “The public is our ally in safe boating.  If you see an impaired operator or someone who is operating in a way that threatens others’ safety, call 911 and report it.  That’s how we can work together to save lives.”  

For more information about Operation Dry Water, visit www.operationdrywater.org.

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Attached Media Files: Operation Dry Water messaging

Marine Board to Hold Rule Hearings on Wake Sports, Solicits Public Comments
Oregon Marine Board - 06/21/18 10:22 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board will be holding an additional rule hearing in Clackamas to gather testimony on proposed statewide rules of operation for wake sports.  Oral testimony will be limited to two minutes per speaker. The hearing will be held at Clackamas Community College, McLaughlin Auditorium (M-121), 19600 Molalla Ave., in Oregon City on July 18 at 6 pm. 

This hearing, is in addition to three other previously scheduled hearings, will be held in different areas of the state:

  • Deschutes County Services Building, Barnes Sawyer Meeting Room, 1300 NW Wall St. in Bend on June 28, beginning at 11 am;
  • Jackson County Parks, Auditorium Room, 7520 Table Rock Rd. in Central Point on July 10, beginning at 6 pm; and,
  • Oregon State Marine Board, Conference Room, 435 Commercial St. NE in Salem on August 15, beginning at 6 pm.

The proposed rule language amends OAR 250-010-0010 Definitions, to include terms used in Chapter 250 of Oregon’s Administrative Rules for wakeboarding and wake surfing; and adopts a new rule, OAR 250-010-0026 Wake Sport Operations, prohibiting wakeboarding and wake surfing within 200 feet of a dock, float, floating home, boathouse, designated boat moorage, floating restroom, or person in the water.  The rule also prohibits wakeboarding and wake surfing within 100 feet of a non-motorized boat. 

Written comments will be accepted until August 31, 2018 by 5 pm and can be submitted via email to .rulemaking@oregon.gov">osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov  or by U.S. mail to: June LeTarte, Administrative Rules Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board, 435 Commercial Street NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301.  Comments via telephone will not be accepted.  

To view the proposed rule language, visit http://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Rulemaking-and-Public-Notices.aspx.

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Oregon Office of Emergency Management Signs Agreement for FEMA Integration Team in Oregon (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/22/18 9:23 AM
Emergency management directors gather in Portland today to sign FEMA Integration Team (FIT) agreement to enhance state preparedness and resilience. Left to right: OEM Director Andrew Phelps, FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O'Hare and Interim Director fo
Emergency management directors gather in Portland today to sign FEMA Integration Team (FIT) agreement to enhance state preparedness and resilience. Left to right: OEM Director Andrew Phelps, FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O'Hare and Interim Director fo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/3986/115537/thumb_20180622_082211.jpg

PORTLAND – June 22, 2018 – FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O’Hare visited Oregon today to meet with Oregon Office of Emergency Management Director Andrew Phelps to sign an agreement that launches the FEMA Integration Team Program in the state. The FIT program will embed FEMA staff with state, local, tribal and territorial emergency management partners to increase capabilities and build resilience before, during and after disasters. 

The agreement was signed at Portland Bureau of Emergency Management offices in Portland to underscore the partnership between agencies at all levels of government.

“Oregon is proud to be among the nation’s first states to participate in the FIT program,” said Andrew Phelps. “It will enhance our capacity to support Oregonians in disasters and strengthen our relationship with FEMA through onsite collaboration and communication.”

The signing of the agreement is the first step toward implementing the FIT program. Through the embedded FIT staff, FEMA will provide technical assistance, training and coordination support for a range of program areas including, but not limited to, all hazards planning, exercise design and evaluation, access and functional needs or disability integration, grants management, and risk assessment and analysis.  The program is expected to be underway by late fall, 2018.




Attached Media Files: Emergency management directors gather in Portland today to sign FEMA Integration Team (FIT) agreement to enhance state preparedness and resilience. Left to right: OEM Director Andrew Phelps, FEMA Region 10 Administrator Mike O'Hare and Interim Director fo

Oregon Heritage Commission grants awarded to museums throughout the state
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/20/18 8:04 AM

Oregon Heritage Commission has awarded nearly $60,000 in grants to nine museums throughout the state. The grants will help fund a variety of projects including collection preservation, visitor education and heritage tourism. Award amounts ranged $4,500 - $8,000.

Funded projects:

  • Clackamas County Historical Society, in Oregon City, for collections inventory and shelving at the Stevens Crawford House.
  • Deschutes County Historical Society, in Bend, for the “Cruisin’ 97” exhibit and geotagging tourism project.
  • Fort Rock Valley Historical Society and Homestead Museum for repairing the Belltable Home at Fort Rock museum complex.
  • High Desert Museum, near Bend, for the “By Her Hand” exhibit, and other historic and contemporary indigenous art.
  • Mount Hood Cultural Center and Museum, in Government Camp, to organize and digitize a historic photograph collection.
  • Oregon Jewish Museum, in Portland, to place online finding aids that link to the museum’s object collection.
  • Oregon Nikkei Endowment, in Portland, to preserve the WWII Minidoka Incarceration Site collection at the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center.
  • Umatilla County Historical Society, in Pendleton, to install the “Umatilla Gold: The History of Wheat in Umatilla County” exhibit.
  • Willamette Heritage Center, in Salem, to preserve and create a finding aid for over 800 plans created by architectural firm Payne, Settecase and Smith.

The museum grant program is offered annually by the Oregon Heritage Commission, part of the Oregon Heritage program at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). The grant program began in 1965 when only 24 organizations were eligible for the program.

The Oregon Heritage Commission works to secure, sustain and enhance Oregon’s heritage. The Commission sponsors heritage initiatives that educate the public about the value of heritage and celebrate the state’s diversity.

The Oregon Heritage Commission consists of nine members appointed by the governor and nine agency advisors. Members are chosen from state agencies and statewide organizations, and represent a diverse geographical and heritage background.

To learn more about the Oregon Museum Grant or the Oregon Heritage Commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at i.gill@oregon.gov">Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


Businesses
PacificSource Health Plans Names Dr. Edward McEachern as EVP and Chief Medical Officer (Photo)
PacificSource Health Plans - 06/21/18 1:31 PM
2018-06/2392/115508/Edward.McEachern.Web357x500.jpg
2018-06/2392/115508/Edward.McEachern.Web357x500.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/2392/115508/thumb_Edward.McEachern.Web357x500.jpg

(SPRINGFIELD, Ore.) June 21, 2018— PacificSource Health Plans has named Dr. Edward McEachern as executive vice president and chief medical officer. Dr. McEachern joined PacificSource in 2015 as medical director for Medicare programs and has been serving as interim chief medical officer since early 2018. In his new role, Dr. McEachern will provide operational and strategic leadership to the clinical enterprise of the company.

Dr. McEachern’s will also work to maintain strong relationships with PacificSource’s provider partners to improve the health outcomes in populations the organization serves in Oregon, Idaho, and Montana.

 

“Dr. McEachern is a proven leader with a track record for producing innovative, industry-changing solutions,” said Ken Provencher, president and CEO of PacificSource. “His global healthcare background, knowledge of care coordination, and mastery of quality management will serve our members well, now and into the future.”

 

Dr. McEachern originally came to PacificSource from Saint Alphonsus Health Alliance in Boise, Idaho, where he was chief medical officer and executive director of operations. Prior to that role, he helmed a venture capital fund that focused on healthcare, and served as chief medical officer for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Ohio.

 

Dr. McEachern is also an associate professor at the University of Utah School of Medicine and an assistant professor at Utah’s David Eccles School of Business. He holds six patents, authored seven books, published more than 80 peer-reviewed articles, and has served as a healthcare consultant for the U.S. State Department and Peace Corps.

 

Outside of work he enjoys music, cycling, hiking, rafting, camping, fishing, and spending time with his wife and teenaged triplets. 

 

About PacificSource Health Plans:

PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Springfield, Oregon, with local offices throughout Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. The PacificSource family of companies employs 1000 people, serves more than 300,000 individuals, and has 3,900 employer clients throughout the Northwest. For more information visit PacificSource.com.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2018-06/2392/115508/Edward.McEachern.Web357x500.jpg

Organizations & Associations
Red Cross Responds to Home Disaster Affecting One Person in Central Point
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/23/18 10:18 PM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded at approximately 8:30 p.m. Saturday, June 23, 2018 in the 6000 block of Gem Road in Central Point, Jackson County, Ore.

The single-family fire affected one adult and five pets.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Red Cross Responds to Home Disaster Affecting Two People in Klamath Falls
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/19/18 11:10 PM

Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded at approximately 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 19, 2018 in the 1000 block of Owens Street in Klamath Falls, Klamath County, Ore.

The single-family fire affected two adults.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits with toiletry items, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services.

Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington (the Cascades Region) helps an average of three families affected by disasters, like home fires, every day.

The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/GetAnAlarm to schedule an appointment.


Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Bestow Highest Honor for 25 Gold Award Girl Scouts on Saturday, June 23, 2018 (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 06/20/18 4:59 PM
GSOSW GA Invite
GSOSW GA Invite
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-06/6250/115091/thumb_GSOSW_Gold_Award_Evite_2018.jpg

Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington to Bestow Highest Honor for 25 Gold Award Girl Scouts this Saturday, June 23, 2018

PORTLAND, Ore. – Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) will recognize 25 recipients of the Girl Scout Gold Award in a special ceremony this Saturday, June 23, 2018, in Salem, Oregon in celebration of 102 years of the organization’s highest award.

Who: 25 Gold Award Girl Scouts, as well as Silver and Bronze Award Girl Scouts, their family and friends, plus staff, volunteers and media

What: Celebration of Girl Scouts changing the world and achieving Girl Scouting's highest honors with a keynote address from Girl Scout alumna and Gold Award recipient Elizabeth Dinh, evening news anchor for Fox 12 Oregon

When: June 23, 2018, at 1 p.m.

Where:  Willamette Heritage Center, 1313 Mill St SE, Salem, Oregon 97301

R.S.V.P.:  The event is by invitation only—interested media must R.S.V.P. by email to: mkenney@girlscoutsosw.org

On-site interviews: GSOSW’s Director of Communications, Sarah Shipe, and Director of Program, Sarah Brown, as well as Gold Award, Silver Award and Bronze Award Girl Scouts, will be available on-site during the day of the event for media interviews.

The Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest honor a Girl Scout can earn, acknowledges each recipient’s dedication to empowering and bettering herself while working to make the world a better place. Just 6% of Girl Scouts earn this prestigious award annually—it has been the pinnacle of the Girl Scout experience since 1916.

“We know that when girls have leadership opportunities when they are young, they are more likely to go on to become leaders in their communities and in their professional lives,” says Sarah Brown, Director of Program for GSOSW. “Through Girl Scouting, GSOSW’s Gold Award Girl Scouts have come to know that they have the ability to make a positive impact. The nature and quality of their Gold Award projects show us that these girls are the leaders of tomorrow, because they are leading today.”

Some of the Gold Award projects completed this year include:

Backpacks for Refugees—backpacks filled with school supplies for refugee students

Bilingual Lending Library— building a bilingual lending library at a local food pantry and collecting books to fill the shelves

Birthday Party Kits for Low-Income Youth— birthday party kits for low-income families, distributed to local shelters and service agencies

Girls Expo—free event to connecting young women to organizations and activities that align with their passions

Me Too—to increase awareness of teen sexual assault

Each Gold Award Girl Scout contributes a minimum of 80 hours to the community through her project, carrying out a plan that has sustainable and measurable, ongoing impact.

“As a Girl Scout alumna, I’m so happy to welcome this next group of talented and smart young women who now join me as a fellow Gold Award recipient,” says Elizabeth Dinh, evening news anchor for FOX 12 Oregon. “It took a lot of hard work and dedication to earn this prestigious award, and I know these Gold Award Girl Scouts will continue to overcome obstacles, pursue their dreams and change the world.”

Girl Scouts celebrates 102 years of Girl Scout Gold Award excellence, innovation, and visionary leadership and continues empowering future generations of girls to follow their dreams, discover their passions and make a global impact.

About Girl Scouts’ Highest Honors

To learn more about Girl Scouts’ highest honors, please visit: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/en/about-girl-scouts/our-program/girl-awards/highest-awards.html.

About Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington

Our council serves 13,955 girls in 37 counties with the help of over 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting develops these essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For more information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.




Attached Media Files: GS Girl Scout Data Report , Gold Award GS Fact Sheet , Gold Award Girl Scouts Press Release , Gold Award Girl Scout Profiles , GSOSW GA Invite , GS Girl Scout Photo 2 , GA Girl Scout Photo 1

Girl Scout Statement About Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 06/20/18 3:14 PM

Girl Scout Statement About Families Separated at the U.S./Mexico Border

FROM GIRL SCOUTS OF THE USA (GSUSA)

GSUSA recently joined other members of Leadership 18—an alliance of CEOs from the nation’s largest and most influential human service nonprofits—in calling on the Trump administration to halt its “zero tolerance” immigration policy that separates children from parents who illegally enter the United States. The Leadership 18 statement asks the administration to “immediately stop this wrong and immoral policy” and to “take immediate steps to restore connections between” separated family members. In conjunction with this statement, GSUSA published a new Raising Awesome Girls piece offering parents and caregivers tips for how to address this difficult and frightening issue with their girls.

Talking to Kids About Children Being Separated from Their Families and Communities: http://bit.ly/2M9yRau 

FROM GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON (GSOSW)

The mission of Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington is to help girls understand and relate to the world around them. For this reason, Girl Scouts joined the other members of Leadership 18 to call for an end to the harmful practice of separating children from their parents. Preparing girls to lead can mean having difficult conversations about current events. The purpose of our Raising Awesome Girls piece is to assist parents and caregivers as they navigate these types of conversations with their girls.


Oregon hospitals provide $2.19 billion in community benefit statewide
Oregon Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 06/21/18 12:18 PM

Today, the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health System (OAHHS) released a report showing that in 2016, Oregon hospitals provided $2.19 billion in community benefit to the communities they serve. From training medical professionals, to funding critical health research, to sponsoring wellness events, hospitals increased spending in state-defined community benefit categories other than charity care by $400 million in 2016, as compared with average levels over the previous three years. This increase continues to fulfill a pledge from early 2015, in which hospitals announced they would offset drops in charity care, as a result in Medicaid expansion, by investing in other state-defined community benefit categories. The statewide total of $2.19 billion was a record high.

“We are very proud of Oregon hospitals’ continued community commitment,” said Andy Van Pelt, executive Vice President of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. “The numbers reflect the profound health needs in our communities that hospitals are addressing. It shows that hospitals continue to go beyond providing high-quality care for the sick and injured and indeed work to the health of communities outside the four walls of the hospital.”

Analysis of the data shows that total community benefit has increased 49 percent from 2010 to 2016 – rising from $1.47 billion in 2010 to $2.19 billion in 2016. Significant subcategory program increases from 2010 to 2016 include:

  • Community building, which include programs that provide opportunities to address root causes of health problems, such as poverty, homelessness, and environmental problems, increased by a significant 150 percent;
  • Community health improvement, which includes school health-education programs, web-based consumer health information, and worksite health education programs, increased by 10 percent;
  • Research increased 12 percent;
  • Health professions education increased 8 percent; and
  • Subsidized health services increased 9 percent.

In the report based on state data, OAHHS highlights not just the numbers behind the community benefit data but also some examples of current community benefit programs around Oregon.

 “These stories show that Oregon’s hospitals are not only continuing to keep their commitment to community benefit spending, but they are going above and beyond in their local communities and are deeply focused on the health needs of the people they serve,” concluded Van Pelt.

In 2007, the Oregon legislature defined community benefit as health care-related services that hospitals provide without the expectation of compensation. It includes but is not limited to such categories as:

  1. Health services to vulnerable or underserved people
  2. Financial or in-kind support for public health programs
  3. Health education, health screenings, and prevention services
  4. Medical research and health professions education
  5. Community-building activities such as neighborhood revitalization projects, or workforce development programs

The hospital stories contained in OAHHS’ report highlight the wide range of services that respond to specific, identified health needs of local communities. If you are interested in learning more about community benefit programs at your local hospital, reach out to your hospital directly for more examples like the ones found in the Community Benefit Report.

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To learn more about Oregon hospitals’ community benefit activities, visit http://www.oahhs.org/policy/community-benefit.

To learn more about the state reporting program of community benefit, visit
https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Hospital-Reporting.aspx

 




Attached Media Files: community benefit

Local Scholars Solve Centuries-Old Mystery of the "Beeswax Wreck" on the Oregon Coast (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 06/25/18 10:09 AM
Cover of the 2018 Summer issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly journal
Cover of the 2018 Summer issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly journal
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A special issue of the Oregon Historical Society’s Oregon Historical Quarterly is dedicated to the research findings

Portland, OR – June 21, 2018 – For centuries, beeswax and Chinese porcelain have washed ashore on Nehalem Spit, on the north Oregon Coast. Now, archival and archaeological evidence point to the Santo Cristo de Burgos, a seventeenth-century Manila galleon owned by the kingdom of Spain, as the mysterious vessel commonly known today as the “Beeswax Wreck.”

Stories of a very large shipwreck began circulating during the earliest days of Euro- American presence in the Pacific Northwest, as fur traders and explorers learned from Native people that a large ship had long ago wrecked on Nehalem Spit, with survivors and cargo that included beeswax. The stories, shrouded by speculation and often contradictory Euro-American folklore, captivated treasure-hunters who searched for a century and a half on nearby Neahkahnie Mountain and the adjacent beaches.

But which ship was it? The archaeologist-led team of the Beeswax Wreck Project used geology, archaeology, and porcelain analysis, combined with documentation from Spanish archives, to pinpoint the ship’s likely identity. Beeswax stamped with Spanish shippers’ marks confirmed the wreck’s origin, and patterns on Chinese porcelain sherds allowed researchers to narrow the date range.

The Spanish Manila galleon trade was the first global network, and close to 300 galleons left the Philippines for Acapulco carrying Asian goods during its 250-year span. The Project determined that the Beeswax wreck was one of two galleons that vanished without a trace: the Santo Cristo de Burgos, which sailed in 1693, or the San Francisco Xavier, which left Manila in 1705. Mapping the location of beeswax deposits allowed Project members to assert with confidence that the ship almost certainly wrecked before the 1700 Cascadia earthquake and tsunami.

Cameron La Follette and her team of archivists then undertook wide-ranging research in the archives of Spain, the Philippines, and Mexico to locate all available information about the Santo Cristo de Burgos of 1693. They discovered the history of the ship’s Captain, Don Bernardo Iñiguez del Bayo; a complete crew and passenger list; and highly important facts about the cargo. Researchers now know that the Santo Cristo de Burgos was carrying 2.5 tons of liquid mercury. If the wreck is located, testing for mercury will provide confirmation of the ship’s identity.

After many years of work to solve this multi-century mystery, La Follette’s research team and the Beeswax Wreck Project group have recently published their findings in a special issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly. The Oregon Historical Quarterly (OHQ) is a peer-reviewed public history journal published by the Oregon Historical Society that brings history about Oregon and the Pacific Northwest to both scholars and general readers. OHQ is one of the largest state historical society journals in the United States and is a recognized and respected source for the history of the Pacific Northwest region.

The Summer 2018 issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly is now available for purchase in the Oregon Historical Society’s Museum Store for $10, and a subscription to OHQ is a benefit of Oregon Historical Society membership. Abstracts for the articles featured in this special issue are available online.

Cameron La Follette will also be giving a free presentation on the Beeswax wreck at the Oregon Historical Society’s monthly Second Sunday program on July 8 at 2pm. Cameron La Follette is the lead researcher and author on almost all of the articles presented in the OHQ special issue “Oregon’s Manila Galleon.” She is lead author of Sustainability and the Rights of Nature: An Introduction; Executive Director of Oregon Coast Alliance, a coastal conservation organization; and an independent researcher.

 


 

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For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.




Attached Media Files: Cover of the 2018 Summer issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly journal , Beeswax found on the Oregon Coast, September 1900, OHS Research Library , Beeswax found on the Oregon Coast, OHS Research Library, OrHi 87551